The Radioactive Grave at Arlington National Cemetery

There’s only one radioactive grave at Arlington National Cemetery. It belongs to Richard McKinley who had the misfortune on being one of three soldiers to be the first casualties of a nuclear accident in the United States.

McKinley had survived the fighting in Korea. He was working on the SL-1 reactor, a small nuclear power plant in Idaho that the army hoped to develop to power its radar facilities in the Artic. An incident On January 3, 1961 that exposed the reactor rods killed McKinley and two others. His body was so riddled with radiation that rescue teams could only handle it for a few minutes at a time.

His body was eventually transferred to a lead-lined casket which was sealed in a concrete vault. On the early hours of January 23 an air force C-54 cargo plane landed at Bolling Air Force Base in Washington. McKinley’s vault was removed from the plane and placed on a flatbed truck for the trip to Arlington. At Arlington, the gravedigger was instructed by the Atomic Energy Commission to dig the grave three feet deeper than usual and line it with concrete.

The burial service was short, only about eight minutes. The family had to sit twenty feet away from the grave. After taps was played and the people dispersed a truck pulled up and poured more concrete into the grave. Once hardened it was covered with topsoil. The Atomic Energy Commission placed a memo in the file at the cemetery’s office instructing that this grave must never be disturbed.

Duration
2 hours
Group Size
2 to 8

Above It All - Washington National Cathedral

Washington National Cathedral is a Gothic masterpiece. Perched on a hill overlooking the city it is the second largest cathedral in the country and the 6th largest in the world. It is a living work of art filled with stained-glass, hand-carved wood, and wrought iron. While a modern structure (finished in 1990) it is constructed in the old-world way and has no structural steel.

from
55 USD
Duration
2 hours 30 minutes
Group Size
1 to 8

Hidden on Capitol Hill

Few people think beyond the Capitol when they think of the Hill. This tour takes you to the heart of a neighborhood with a fascinating history that still speaks to us today. Learn about these famous locations from a former Capitol Hill resident.

from
250 USD
Duration
2 hours 30 minutes
Group Size
1 to 8

Embassy Row: Divinity & Diplomats

Most Embassy Row tours don’t venture far beyond Dupont Circle. But ours does. We see it all from top to bottom. This stretch of Massachusetts Avenue used to be called Millionaires Row where Gilded Age robber-barons built grand mansions. Today those mansions house most of Washington’s embassies, along with private clubs and statues of world heroes such as Mandela, Gandhi, and Churchill – and we will be right in the heart of it.

from
250 USD