Remembering the WWII Home Front in DC and St Simons, Georgia

One of the things I like best about the WWII Memorial is that it remembers everything and everyone that made victory possible. Because the war wasn’t won by only those in combat. It took a monumental effort on the home front to feed and supply our troops.

The wreaths of oak leaves represent America’s industrial might – the ability to manufacture planes, ships, bullets and faster than our advisories. And the wreaths of wheat represent America’s agricultural production – the ability to feed everyone at home, troops around the world and sailors on the seven seas. And after the war, to feed our former enemies through the Marshal Plan.

But to get a better idea of the sacrifices made by those at home, I had to travel to the sleepy beach town of St Simons, Georgia. Its laid-back vibe belies its home front role in WWII. The story is told in the World War II Home Front Museum in what used to be a Coast Guard station.

This museum is a real gem. It tells the story of how St Simons was transformed by the war. An airport was built to train navy pilots. Blimps patrolled to coast looking for U-boats. And in households here and across the country food, clothing, shoes, tires, and gasoline was rationed for civilian use. And coastal towns like St Simons had blackouts so U-boats couldn’t spot ships against the night lights of the town.

What struck me most about this museum is how it conveyed the spirit of the home front. No one complained about how their rights were being violated because they had to turn their lights out at night. The cause was bigger than that. And success depended on everyone doing their part.

So, if you’re visiting St Simons or Washington, DC make sure you stop and remember the sacrifices made on the home front.

Duration
3 hours
Group Size
1 to 8

Arlington National Cemetery: The Work of the Dead

Every working day more than twenty Americans who sacrificed for their country are buried at Arlington National Cemetery.  On this tour we learn that while Arlington's dead rest in peace, they are always working.  Here we will explore how people from every background remind us of our heritage and our responsibility to one another.

from
250 USD
Duration
2 hours 30 minutes
Group Size
1 to 8

Hidden on Capitol Hill

Few people think beyond the Capitol when they think of the Hill. This tour takes you to the heart of a neighborhood with a fascinating history that still speaks to us today. Learn about these famous locations from a former Capitol Hill resident.

from
250 USD
Duration
2 hours 30 minutes
Group Size
1 to 8

Embassy Row: Divinity & Diplomats

Most Embassy Row tours don’t venture far beyond Dupont Circle. But ours does. We see it all from top to bottom. This stretch of Massachusetts Avenue used to be called Millionaires Row where Gilded Age robber-barons built grand mansions. Today those mansions house most of Washington’s embassies, along with private clubs and statues of world heroes such as Mandela, Gandhi, and Churchill – and we will be right in the heart of it.

from
250 USD