DC’s Longest Protest

Protests happen every day in Washington.  Some are big with hundreds of thousands of marchers.  Others are just one person with a sign.

Regardless of size, it’s one of the things I love about this city – seeing people gather to exercise their First Amendment rights. And it reminds me that in many countries you could be arrested, or worse, for doing something we take for granted.

The White House is an effective spot for protests. It a symbol of government power and there are always reporters around. Women demanding the right to vote were the first to figure that out. And they were the first to do it when they stood at these gates and quietly pressured President Woodrow Wilson to support the 19thamendment.

And while you never know what the issue may be on any day, you can be sure you’ll always find the Peace Vigil outside the White House. The Peace Vigil started in 1981, at the end of the Cold War, when there was a growing fear of nuclear war. And it’s been here ever since. And it’s been incredibly successful. There hasn’t been a nuclear war since they started.

As time goes by the vigil has gone on to be witnesses to a host of other issues that threaten our country and our planet. But there are some rules for a protest like this. First, there must always be someone here. If the protesters leave the site, the Park Police are within their rights to remove the tarp and signs. You can’t just put-up signs and leave. Second, protesters must stay awake. If you’re sleeping in under the tarp, that’s camping. And this is one national park where camping isn’t allowed.

That’s why the Peace Vigil protesters work in shifts. Someone is always here and awake. And they’re happy to talk with you about why they’re here, so don’t be afraid to engage them in conversation.

Lastly, anyone can do this. To protest outside the White House, just show up. No permit is needed. And you’ll be taking part in an activity that’s as old as our nation.

Duration
3 hours
Group Size
1 to 8

Arlington National Cemetery: The Work of the Dead

Every working day more than twenty Americans who sacrificed for their country are buried at Arlington National Cemetery.  On this tour we learn that while Arlington's dead rest in peace, they are always working.  Here we will explore how people from every background remind us of our heritage and our responsibility to one another.

from
250 USD
Duration
2 hours 30 minutes
Group Size
1 to 8

Hidden on Capitol Hill

Few people think beyond the Capitol when they think of the Hill. This tour takes you to the heart of a neighborhood with a fascinating history that still speaks to us today. Learn about these famous locations from a former Capitol Hill resident.

from
250 USD
Duration
2 hours 30 minutes
Group Size
1 to 8

Embassy Row: Divinity & Diplomats

Most Embassy Row tours don’t venture far beyond Dupont Circle. But ours does. We see it all from top to bottom. This stretch of Massachusetts Avenue used to be called Millionaires Row where Gilded Age robber-barons built grand mansions. Today those mansions house most of Washington’s embassies, along with private clubs and statues of world heroes such as Mandela, Gandhi, and Churchill – and we will be right in the heart of it.

from
250 USD