Medgar Evers: American Martyr in Arlington National Cemetery

Medgar Evers is an American martyr. He grew up in Mississippi.  After high school he joins the army and fought in the battle of Normandy in WWII. He returns home and graduates from Alcorn State College.  

Evers was an insurance salesman, but his real vocation was organizing. He began a boycott of gas stations that refused blacks the use of their restrooms, helped James Meredith enroll in the University of Mississippi, he organized protests about the segregation of Biloxi’s beaches, and helped integrate Jackson’s buses and public parks. He led voter registration drives and used a boycott to integrate the Mississippi State Fair.

 

But all his activism attracted the attention of the Ku Klux Klan and the White Citizens Council. Evers lived in constant fear for his life. 

In the early morning of June 12, 1963, Evers returned home from a voting rights meeting.  As he gets of his car he is shot in the back. He fell to the ground and staggered to his front door where his wife finds him.  He dies 50 minutes later. He was 37 years old. 

If you have problems understanding what Black Lives Matter means, look no further to the trial of Evers’ killer.

 

Byron de la Beckwith a member of the white citizens council and KKK was arrested for the murder. But all-white juries twice deadlock and do not convict him. Clearly, to the jurors of Mississippi, Evers’s life did not matter.

Beckwith was free for the next 30 years. But in 1994 the federal government, having new evidence, tries Beckwith again.  This time he is found guilty.   He dies in prison.

3,000 people gather at Arlington for Evers’ military burial.  After Evers is laid to rest, his wife, brother, and thousands of others go back to do the work for which he died.

Duration
3 hours
Group Size
1 to 8

Arlington National Cemetery: The Work of the Dead

Every working day more than twenty Americans who sacrificed for their country are buried at Arlington National Cemetery.  On this tour we learn that while Arlington's dead rest in peace, they are always working.  Here we will explore how people from every background remind us of our heritage and our responsibility to one another.

from
250 USD
Duration
2 hours 30 minutes
Group Size
1 to 8

Hidden on Capitol Hill

Few people think beyond the Capitol when they think of the Hill. This tour takes you to the heart of a neighborhood with a fascinating history that still speaks to us today. Learn about these famous locations from a former Capitol Hill resident.

from
250 USD
Duration
2 hours 30 minutes
Group Size
1 to 8

Embassy Row: Divinity & Diplomats

Most Embassy Row tours don’t venture far beyond Dupont Circle. But ours does. We see it all from top to bottom. This stretch of Massachusetts Avenue used to be called Millionaires Row where Gilded Age robber-barons built grand mansions. Today those mansions house most of Washington’s embassies, along with private clubs and statues of world heroes such as Mandela, Gandhi, and Churchill – and we will be right in the heart of it.

from
250 USD