Graduating from Electoral College

The National Archives is more than the place to see the constitution and the Declaration of Independence. It also has a key role managing the Electoral College. The Electoral College is a process, not a place. And the Archives has a key role in making that process work.

Since given the job by President Harry Truman in 1950, The Archives work with the states to make sure that each state’s Certificate of Ascertainment and Vote include the proper information. Take a look at the actual electoral certificates from this and past years of each state. Note that some are rather plain (South Dakota) while others (Pennsylvania) retain a bit of Elizabethan English used when the colonies were founded.

After the certificates are accepted, the Archives hands them over to the Senate to be counted. The certificates are available for public inspection for one year after the election before being put in the permanent collection.

Everyone should take some time when touring Washington to see the Charters of Freedom at the Archives. Most people, however, miss some of the wonderful objects in the Archives’ galleries. I’d be happy to show them to you so your time in Washington is well spent!

David Shaw

When not showing visitors the District (that’s what residents call Washington) I enjoy reading, grilling, and traveling. I’ve been to nineteen countries and every state except Idaho and Nebraska. I am a Certified Master Guide of the Guild of Professional...

David Shaw Full Bio
Duration
3 hours
Group Size
1 to 8

Arlington National Cemetery: The Work of the Dead

Every working day more than twenty Americans who sacrificed for their country are buried at Arlington National Cemetery.  On this tour we learn that while Arlington's dead rest in peace, they are always working.  Here we will explore how people from every background remind us of our heritage and our responsibility to one another.

from
250 USD
Duration
2 hours 30 minutes
Group Size
1 to 8

Hidden on Capitol Hill

Few people think beyond the Capitol when they think of the Hill. This tour takes you to the heart of a neighborhood with a fascinating history that still speaks to us today. Learn about these famous locations from a former Capitol Hill resident.

from
250 USD
Duration
2 hours 30 minutes
Group Size
1 to 8

Embassy Row: Divinity & Diplomats

Most Embassy Row tours don’t venture far beyond Dupont Circle. But ours does. We see it all from top to bottom. This stretch of Massachusetts Avenue used to be called Millionaires Row where Gilded Age robber-barons built grand mansions. Today those mansions house most of Washington’s embassies, along with private clubs and statues of world heroes such as Mandela, Gandhi, and Churchill – and we will be right in the heart of it.

from
250 USD